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Jets need to employ two tight ends

Dec 27, 2015; East Rutherford, NJ, USA; New York Jets wide receiver Quincy Enunwa (81) runs the ball during overtime against New England Patriots cornerback Leonard Johnson (34) at MetLife Stadium. New York Jets defeat the New England Patriots 26-20 in OT. Mandatory Credit: Jim O
Dec 27, 2015; East Rutherford, NJ, USA; New York Jets wide receiver Quincy Enunwa (81) runs the ball during overtime against New England Patriots cornerback Leonard Johnson (34) at MetLife Stadium. New York Jets defeat the New England Patriots 26-20 in OT. Mandatory Credit: Jim O
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The New York Jets need to eliminate the fullback from their offensive sets and go with two tight ends like their AFC East division rival New England Patriots.

Last season when it came to tight ends, the New York Jets primarily used them as blockers in pass protection and especially in helping establish the run. Heading into the upcoming season however, the Jets have two tight ends that could surprise many in Jace Amaro and even wide receiver Quincy Enunwa.

Related Story: Quincy Enunwa taking the next step

As Paul Esden Jr. wrote about Enunwa recently here on The Jet Press: “Originally the intent by the coaching staff was for Enunwa to be a tight end, but that all changed when Jace Amaro went down. Offensive coordinator Chan Gailey has made his stance known that he wants bigger receivers in the lineup and that forced Jeremy Kerley out of the equation.”

Enunwa isn’t slow, but he’s not a speed demon either.  He has average speed, but if he is used at tight end, that speed can be used as a threat against linebackers, and if teams line up a safety against him, he would be too big (6’2, 225 pounds) for them to handle.

The Jets can get a similar match-up in the slot, but he’s also a good blocker and can be used as a blocker for the inside as well as the outside.  If the Jets use him as both a slot receiver and tight end, when he’s in the slot, they can run toward his side on outside runs.

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The Jets are currently developing rookie Charone Peake.

The Jets are in a very good situation offensively, for their future.

The three-headed monster of Enunwa, Peake and Amaro could be the future.

As mentioned earlier last season, the Jets’ tight ends had eight receptions on 25 targets for 95 yards and one touchdown.

Enunwa was targeted 46 times, had 22 receptions for 315 yards.  Even though he didn’t score, having a more reliable tight end, and even a tight end tandem, would give quarterback Geno Smith some more confidence.

One thing he needs to clean up though is drops.  Even though he caught 22 receptions, according to Sporting Charts, he had five drops on 46 targets.  That is a drop percentage of 10.9% which is not good at all.

The only issue with moving Enunwa to tight end is only that.  At the tight end position, you need to have reliable hands.  Once again, according to Sporting Charts, 24 tight ends had at least 46 targets in 2015, none of them dropped more than 10% of their targets.

If the Jets wanted to play an empty backfield set, it would be a tough offense to stop.  If you have Enunwa and Amaro at the tight ends, Eric Decker and Brandon Marshall on the outside, and Peake in the slot, they’d have a speed threat in Peake, great receivers on the outside and solid receivers in the middle.

When teams decide to play coverage against that set, then Smith could take advantage of his athleticism and run.  If a team decides to put pressure on Smith by blitzing, someone will be open.

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If the Jets want to make another NFL Playoff run, regardless of how tough their schedule is, Enunwa will have to be a big piece to the puzzle.  If he takes the next step in development, the Jets will be even more dangerous this time around on offense.

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