NY Jets 7-round mock draft following the Mike Williams signing

The Jets trade down and make some major moves in our latest mock draft

Brock Bowers
Brock Bowers / Todd Kirkland/GettyImages
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Round 4, 111th Overall, NY Jets: Audric Estime, RB, Notre Dame

The Jets seem likely to add a running back at some point this offseason, and while that could very well come in free agency, it wouldn't be shocking to see the team invest another mid-round draft pick into the position.

Notre Dame's Audric Estime fits the criteria of what the Jets should be looking for in a running back this offseason. At 5-foot-11, 221 pounds, Estime is a strong, powerful running back who possesses excellent contact balance and deceptive home-run ability.

Estime thrives between the tackles with fantastic contact balance and plus-vision. He also has some versatility as a pass-catcher and pass-blocker, making him valuable in third-down situations.

The Jets should be looking for a powerful short-yardage back who can complement Breece Hall and Israel Abanikanda, and Estime gives them exactly that. He's going to be a good NFL player.

Round 4, 134th Overall, NY Jets: Beau Brade, S, Maryland

The Jets parted ways with Jordan Whitehead this offseason and have yet to bring back Ashtyn Davis. Though the team did re-sign Chuck Clark, it would make sense for the Jets to add to the position in the draft (if not through free agency).

Maryland's Beau Brade is one of the most well-rounded safety prospects in this year's draft. At 6-foot, 2303 pounds, Brade aligned all over Maryland's defense and is comfortable both in the box and patrolling the defensive backfield in coverage.

While Brade isn't the biggest nor the most athletic safety prospect, he comes with an NFL-ready skill set that should allow him to find a home early in his pro career.

The Jets have prioritized safeties that have the versatility to play interchangeable roles. Brade's high-floor skill set and college experience make him an ideal third safety in Robert Saleh's defense.