Did Adrian Amos take veiled shot at NY Jets after Mecole Hardman drama?

Amos is bitter about his Jets tenure

Adrian Amos
Adrian Amos / Kevin Sabitus/GettyImages
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Because the NY Jets can never have a week where they don't end up in the national spotlight for something silly, former wide receiver Mecole Hardman decided to make himself the main character of NFL Twitter for a day after ripping the team's operations and culture in a wide-ranging interview.

Hardman was soundly ripped by Jets fans for his admission he refused to come into a game due to a minor pinky injury. Jets players like Thomas Morstead called him a "disgruntled former employee" bitter about how he lost playing time to an undrafted rookie in Xavier Gipson, while Sauce Gardner and Kenny Yeboah took it a step further.

Gardner and Yeboah both hinted that Hardman was leaking parts of the team's gameplan before their win against the Philadelphia Eagles, with Connor Hughes confirming the team widely believes Hardman sabotaged them against Philly and the Kansas City Chiefs. Another former Jet jumped into the fray after these accusations.

Former Jets safety Adrian Amos, who was also cut loose before the end of the season, tweeted that it's easy to see why certain teams stay bad every year right after Hardman came out with so much vitriol. It's easy to read the tea leaves and see that Amos was unimpressed with his tenure as a Jet.

While Amos may have been taking shots at teams who graded poorly in the NFLPA's annual survey (the Jets landing 21st in this exercise), the timing of this tweet, coupled with the fact that Amos' situation on defense almost exactly mirrors what happened to Hardman on offense makes the timing too coincidental.

Former NY Jets safety Adrian Amos appears to take shot at old team

Signed by the Jets as a veteran replacement for Chuck Clark after his injury, Amos was unable to replicate his success from Chicago or Green Bay. The Jets' defense, who was even singled out by Hardman as a well above-average unit, decided to play Ashtyn Davis and Tony Adams over Amos.

Amos, like Hardman, seemed to get the last laugh, however. He was signed by the Houston Texans after parting with New York and was along for the ride when C.J. Stroud helped them win a playoff game. With just five tackles as a Texan, Amos' role was more spectator than on-field contributor.

While Hardman and Amos might have some very real problems with how business is conducted in New York, the fact that both of them were sent away before the end of the year amid mutual frustration with a lack of playing time makes them look less like truthtellers and more like scorned ex-lovers.

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