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Jets 2017 Report Card: Grading the tight ends

By Luis Tirado Jr.
EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ - OCTOBER 15: Tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins #88 of the New York Jets runs the ball for what was originally called a touchdown against strong safety Duron Harmon #30 of the New England Patriots during the fourth quarter of their game at MetLife Stadium on October 15, 2017 in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Replay Official reviewed the runner broke the plane ruling, and the play was reversed and called a fumble. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)
EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ - OCTOBER 15: Tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins #88 of the New York Jets runs the ball for what was originally called a touchdown against strong safety Duron Harmon #30 of the New England Patriots during the fourth quarter of their game at MetLife Stadium on October 15, 2017 in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Replay Official reviewed the runner broke the plane ruling, and the play was reversed and called a fumble. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)
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Before the start of 2017, a new offensive coordinator in John Morton was in town and promised to use tight ends more than just as blockers. Here’s a final grade for the positional group of the New York Jets based on last season.

Before the season began, tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins was suspended for the first few games by the NFL which prompted the New York Jets to have someone experienced to start in his place. They turned to tight end Will Tye to hold the fort until Seferian-Jenkins was eligible to return and well, he didn’t do much of anything.

In the few games Tye played, he only totaled 38 receiving yards, four receptions, and didn’t score a single touchdown. He didn’t last long with the Jets but once Seferian-Jenkins came back, he truly started off red-hot for the Jets.

Slimmer, focused, and determined, Seferian-Jenkins rose to the occasion and was finally a tight end on the Jets that was able not only keep those chains moving but score touchdowns on key drives. He caught everything coming his way for the first games of the season and all throughout, was a threat on offense due to his 6-6, 262 lbs. frame that was used to his advantage.

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Last season, Seferian-Jenkins totaled 357 receiving yards, 50 receptions, and three touchdowns. The final slate of games during the regular season, Seferian-Jenkins fizzled out and wasn’t that much of a factor but the overall atmosphere of the Jets wasn’t good. They kept losing games and had some controversial calls against them, two of which directly involved Seferian-Jenkins on two game-changing touchdowns that were deemed to be “incomplete passes” by the refs.

Yeah, at the end of the day, it is what it is but Seferian-Jenkins exceeded expectations this season and showed promise that he can continue honing his craft to being a complete tight end. His backup, hybrid tight end/wide receiver Eric Tomlinson also helped out whenever his number was called.

Tomlinson totaled 121 receiving yards, eight receptions, and a touchdown. Tomlinson might not be starting material but was good depth when needed. For the first time in what seems like forever, the Jets tight end situation wasn’t as abysmal as it was for the past few years and was a factor in football games.

2017 Grade: C+

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